Lymphoma support groups

As with virtually every other disease and disorder, people with lymphoma can gain a lot of value from lymphoma support groups. While there is no direct evidence that support groups raise cure rates or help patients physically overcome their disease, there is little question that they provide the kind of hope, information, charity, love and basic human contact that improve one's quality of life.

Lymphoma patients and caregivers are often encouraged to attend and/or participate in support groups, in part because of the priceless information they find. This is especially true for lymphonma becuase it is such a confusing disease, laden with dozens of unfamiliar-sounding subtypes and perplexing medical jargon.

Additionally, when one receives a lymphoma diagnosis, they often run straight to the internet, where their worry and confusion is compounded by half-truths and bad information.

A support group is a place that provides a continuity of information and individuals—whether it's in person hosted by a hospital, or hosted by an organization such as the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, or whether it's online at such sites as supportgroups.com, where the motto nicely sums up what an online support group is all about: "A helping hand on demand." SupportGroups.com has a dedicated Cancer Support Group.

For persons given a lymphoma diagnosis, learning the ropes of this massive, many-headed disease, and learning the intricacies of the treatment process and where and how doctors make the decisions they do, lymphoma support groups are simply unbeatable, short of having a lymphoma expert at one's beck and call.

While no one would wish lymphoma on anyone, the reality is that when you're given such a diagnosis the most valuable people in your life will probably not include your doctor, but it will likely include the new friends you meet in lymphoma support groups—empathetic people who know what you're going through and can give you reassurance or information or just make you laugh at the right time.

Lymphoma support groups don't fit every personality, but everybody can get something of value out of them.

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