Surviving Lymphoma: Checkup Anxiety

Many patients become anxious before checkups with their doctor, especially after they enter remission. The idea that the cancer could relapse is extremely frightening and is nothing to be ashamed of. In fact, the reaction is quite normal. After going through harsh treatments like chemotherapy or radiation, it is only natural for patients to be scared of repeating the process if their cancer comes back. The idea that secondary cancers could develop or other late effects could happen is just as scary.

If you feel anxious prior to a doctor’s appointment, then let your physician know. Don’t be afraid to ask questions about all of the tests you go through. Anxiety can lead to restlessness, distraction, and physical illness like nausea, so your doctor should provide you with all of the relief possible. Answering your questions and monitoring your health is the best way for the doctor to help.

Another thing to remember is to have a positive attitude. Happy thoughts can lead to confidence and improve your overall health. Plus, current lymphoma treatments are highly effective in most cases, with survival rates higher than most other cancers. Keep this in mind and continually think of how likely it is that you’ll survive without further problems.

If you find that you cannot calm yourself down, enlist family members or friends. Try soothing activities. In the worst case scenario, your doctor may prescribe anti-anxiety medications.

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