Pennsylvania State Senator diagnosed with follicular NHL

Pennsylvania State Senator Mike Folmer (R-Lebanon) has announced that he has been diagnosed with lymphoma.

Specifically, Sen. Folmer has been diagnosed with follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a not-uncommon diagnosis for his age group, and the most commonly diagnosed NHL subtype.

His statement:

“In the spirit of the openness and transparency I often talk so much about, I want to share with my constituents and colleagues that I have been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. My specific type is follicular grade I, the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and highly treatable. I join more than a half of million other Americans living with the disease, and look forward to joining the many others who have been successfully treated, including Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, hockey great Mario Lemieux, and former United States Senator Arlen Specter.

“Those who know me best are aware of my strong faith and the importance of family, and as my doctors chart a course of treatment, I will rely on my faith and support of family and friends. As Jeremiah 29:11 reads: ‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ says the Lord. ‘They are plans for good and not for disaster, to give you a future and a hope.’

“As I begin and continue with treatments, I plan to attend to Senate business as normal and remain as committed to representing the citizens of the 48th district as I have been since taking office. I also give my word to my constituents I will periodically update them on my condition through various forms of media and my weekly e-newsletter, Mike’s Memo.”

It should be noted that the personalities noted by the Senator were all diagnosed and treated for Hodgkin's lymphoma, not follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (although Allen was later diagnosed with NHL as well).

Source: WHP TV

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