Ding Ding Ding! Done! ("If Winter Comes" No. 22)

Two down a few more to go!

Suzie the nurse that took care of AJ today was a doll. I can't believe how lucky we have been with all the nurses we have met. They have all been phenomenal.

First when we came in AJ got to sit in the recliner and then Suzie came and explained everything about CHOP - that took a while... :) We stopped asking questions in the end so it would wrap up a little quicker.

The first bag they put was just normal saline to flush the brand new Power port 'line' - worked like a charm. Suzie said she got excellent blood return. She sent some off to the lab and white blood cell count came back at 10 - still doing great.

Then it was a bag of anti nausea IV and then the rest. It went pretty quick and AJ was working away as they were doing it.

We came home and AJ took a bit of a snooze and ate some food. When he woke up around 4 he felt a little 'funny' so he took an anti nausea pill. Then he was fine, took another one tonight and now we are in bed watching TV. He doesn't feel sick or nauseous, he says its just feels like they poured a bunch of toxic stuff in his body. Which they have. Looking at it in another way, it would be weird if he DIDN'T have any side effects from chemo.

They do think that his side effects will be pretty low though, due to that last time he got Chop, everything was out of whack. This time around the previous chemo has helped to 'control' the cancer so its not as crazy. One day at the time :))

Other than that Adrian is doing really well. His spirit is up and he is pretty much like normal. Unless you knew what was going on inside, you wouldn't know.

Tomorrow we go to Seton for the chemo in the spine, they said it shouldn't hurt that bad at all. He has already had a spinal tap and did fine, so this won't be any worse…

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