How to Prevent Lymphoma: Is It Possible?

In order to prevent developing any subtype of lymphoma, it would be helpful to know the causes of lymphoma. Unfortunately, in virtually every case of lymphoma, it is impossible to know what caused the disease. This is true across almost all cancers. Generally speaking the only knowledge we have about causes of cancer is derived from epidemiological studies.

That said, there are some steps one can take to reduce one's risk of developing cancer in general and to a small degree, lymphoma specifically. Click on the link within each heading for more information.

Lymphoma Prevention: Exercise and Physical Activity

The American Cancer Society stresses the importance of exercise and physical activity in preventing cancers, although they say nothing too specific about how this directly relates to lymphoma. Nonetheless, exercise and physical activity contribute to an overall improved health and provided one is healthy enough, one should discuss the merits with one's doctor.

Lymphoma Prevention: Environmental Exposures

One of the most evidence-based, epidemiologically proven causes of lymphoma is through environmental exposures. Certain chemicals and their uses have been linked to lymphomas and other cancers and there are some steps that can be taken to limit one's exposure to these chemicals.

Lymphoma Prevention: Diet and Nutrition

The American Cancer Society also stresses the importance of diet and nutrition in preventing cancer. They aren't specific to lymphoma, and in reality there appears to be little evidence that diet and nutrition play a big part in lymphoma. However, there are plenty of good reasons why one should adopt good habits regarding diet and nutrition in addition to preventing cancer.

Lymphoma Prevention: Viral and Bacterial Sources

Certain viral and bacterial sources have been linked to specific subtypes of lymphoma, and they include MALT lymphoma, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and Burkitt's lymphoma, among others. In most cases, the viruses and bacteria associated with these cancers are widespread and much of the population is already infected; the pathogen involved is typically harmless unless other circumstances prevail.

Lymphoma Prevention: Secondary Cancer and Survivorship

For people who have already beaten lymphoma, one of the best ways to prevent a recurrence of lymphoma or other cancers is through a survivorship plan, something one develops in conjunction with their primary care doctor.

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