Charities for Dogs with Lymphoma Cancer

As the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in dogs, lymphoma affects millions of pets each year. Survival rates are low, with untreated dogs living only four to six weeks on average. Even successful chemotherapy rarely extends survival beyond a year. There are a number of charities for dogs with lymphoma cancer and canine cancers in general. The following resources will be helpful for anyone seeking help for their pet or who wish to donate to a very worthy cause:

The National Canine Cancer Foundation

This is the major player in canine cancer research, funding research initiatives and establishing more effective diagnostic and treatment protocols. Thanks to their work, a National Institutes of Health-funded project has successfully mapped the entire canine genome, opening new avenues of research for lymphoma and other canine cancers.

The stated mission of the NCCF is "to encourage and provide grant support for basic, pre-clinical and clinical research in high impact and innovative cancer research, which is intended to develop innovative approaches to a cure, treatment, diagnosis or prevention of cancers in dogs."

The NCCF can be contacted at:

National Canine Cancer Foundation
13835 N. Tatum Blvd
Suite 9-448
Phoenix, AZ 85032-5590

and online at www.wearethecure.org.

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

While not a charity focused specifically on canine cancer, the ASPCA has long been a voice for furry friends in need. They actively rescue pets from abuse, lobby for better adoption and humaneness laws, and provide resources for pet owners. Their website has a wealth of information about canine well-being and health.

The contact address for the ASPCA is:

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)
424 E. 92nd St
New York, NY 10128-6804

and their website is at www.aspca.org.

Canine Cancer Awareness

CCA collects donations and distributes them to veterinarians who perform pro bono cancer treatments for families who could not otherwise afford them. Through their website and outreach activities, they strive to spread awareness of the challenges faced by dogs with lymphoma and other cancers and their owners. They are a tax-deductible non-profit, and donate 100 percent of the funds they receive directly to veterinarians.

You can reach CCA at:

Canine Cancer Awareness, Inc.
44 Devoe Street
Brooklyn, NY 11211

and at their website, caninecancerawareness.org.

Your Local Humane Society

Another wide-ranging animal welfare organization, your local humane society will be able to help you identify resources and ways to get involved in the fight against canine lymphoma.

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