Chicken with Cabbage and Leek from the American Institute for Cancer Research

The American Institute for Cancer Research continues to encourage and promote better lifestyle choices with a view towards lowering one's risk of developing cancer through better dietary choices. This time they're looking forward to St. Patrick's day with a recipe that is not only healthy but also celebratory of the culinary traditions of the Republic of Ireland.

For St. Patrick’s Day, I am making this one-pot chicken, which is pan-seared and then roasted on a bed of cabbage, Brussels sprouts and leeks. Roasting under the chicken, the vegetables soften and caramelize as they baste in the juices. The chef’s touch is smoked paprika. Its flavor, married with the sweetness of the roasted vegetables, makes this dish a hit and shows off Irish cooking at its best.

Chicken Baked with Cabbage and Leek

  • 1 (2 lb.) Savoy or Napa cabbage
  • 8 large Brussels sprouts
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 (3 lb.) chicken, cut into 8 pieces, or 4 (6 oz.) chicken breast halves with rib and skin
  • 1 large leek, white part and 1-inch light green part, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • 1 medium onion, halved and sliced crosswise
  • 1 Tbsp. dried thyme
  • 1/2 tsp. Spanish paprika
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups fat-free, reduced-sodium chicken broth

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Halve cabbage vertically and set one half aside for another use. Cut remaining cabbage into 2 wedges and cut away core. Cut wedges crosswise into 3/4-inch strips. There will be about 4 cups. Cut each Brussels sprout vertically into 4 slices.

In medium skillet that can go into oven, heat oil over medium-high heat. Reserving wings for another use, arrange chicken skin side down in hot pan and cook until skin is browned, turning pieces as needed, about 8 minutes. Transfer chicken to plate. Pour off all but 1 tablespoon of drippings from pan.

Add cabbage, Brussels sprouts, leek and onion to pan, stirring to coat with remaining drippings. Cook, stirring occasionally, until cabbage and onion are limp and onion translucent, about 5 minutes. Add thyme, paprika, salt and pepper to taste, and mix to combine. Return chicken to pan, placing pieces skin side up on top of vegetables. Pour in broth. Place pan in oven, uncovered.

Bake for 35 minutes, or until an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of chicken registers 160 degrees, about 15 minutes for breast, 20 minutes for thigh.

To serve, remove skin from chicken and divide pieces among four dinner plates. Spoon one-fourth of vegetables on top of or next to chicken. Spoon pan juices over chicken and vegetables.

Makes 4 servings

Per serving: 348 calories, 12 g total fat (3 g saturated fat), 23 g carbohydrate, 39 g protein, 8 g dietary fiber, 360 mg sodium.

Source: American Institute for Cancer Research

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