Why I Support Facebook's Censoring of The Scar Project's Photos

I might be in the minority, but I am okay with Facebook’s decision to censor The Scar Project’s photos of topless women exposing the scars they’ve accumulated in their battles with breast cancer. Here’s why:

1) Just because I have mastectomy scars and reconstructed breasts does not mean I want to see the scars and breasts of other women. I want the choice and can go The Scar Project’s website if I choose to view the photos;

2) I’m a business owner serving women suffering from drastic appearance changes. I understand that while my customers have some things in common, they are unique individuals. I feel the need to be sensitive to ALL of them. As a business owner, I understand why Facebook would have policies designed to minimize the number of users offended by Facebook content;

3) I’m asking myself, should Facebook be expected to promote causes?

I am a supporter of The Scar Project. I applaud David Jay’s work, his ability to capture our pain, and his willingness to use his talents to tell our story through amazing photographs. I am aware that many, many, many women find healing and acceptance through his photos, but I am not one of them. They make me uncomfortable and I suspect that there are other women who like me, have surrendered their breasts and gained scars in a determined effort to beat or cheat cancer, and who are not looking for photographic reminders. We’re all different. I applaud the project and I agree with Facebook’s policy to censor the photos and give we Facebook user’s the choice to see or not see photos of other women’s breasts, breastless chests, and scars.

Are you familiar with The Scar Project? How do you feel about Facebook policies to censor The Scar Project’s photos on their Facebook page?

Susan Beausang, 4women.com

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